Eder Muniz

Eder Muniz

Eder Muniz

Eder Muniz

Eder Muniz

Eder Muniz

"Fé nos Nossos" (Faith in our Own)
2022

Fé nos Nossos (Faith in our own) by Eder Muniz is a mural commissioned by the Behner Stiefel Center of Brazilian Studies in partnership with the School of Art + Design at San Diego State University to honor of Marielle Franco (1979-2018). Known simply as Marielle in Brazil, she was elected to the Rio de Janeiro city council in 2016 and served from 2017 until her assassination in 2018. Born and raised in the low-income Complexo de Maré, she was a first-generation college student, earning a bachelors in social science from Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro and went on to earn a masters degree in public administration at the Universidade Federal Fluminense. Marielle identified as bisexual and was a defender of LGBTQIA+ rights, a feminist, and fought against police brutality and the violent interventions of the Military Police in working-class communities known as favelas. On March 14, 2018 after moderating a panel at a community center for Black women in Rio, she was assassinated in her car. Her driver, Anderson Gomes, was also killed. Marielle’s’s assassination sparked an outcry in Brazil and around the world. Her murder is still unsolved.

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Leaf Pattern Design

Artist Statement by Eder Muniz

It’s an honor to be invited to represent with my work a person of such great strength and who is a symbol for a community, a city, and a whole country. And with this invitation I had the opportunity to learn more about her and her story, her political positions and her ideas, and I was even more taken by her. I would have liked to have known her personally and to have been her friend. In the piece, I tried to transmit this presence and this symbol that inspires other people, especially as a woman. The political symbol and taking a stand and cultural themes. In the mural there are small fragments that show Afro-Brazilian culture, our history, our background, our Afro-mythology and the idea of the quilombo and the favela as a new quilombo, where people escaped and are the resistance. And the place that feeds the city, the favela. Marielle understood this, and that’s why she respects the favela, and especially respects women who raise the favela. Marielle was well aware of this. The piece is a homage to women. There’s the moon, which is super connected to the body of the woman and their cycles. The piece talks about her positions, looking to the future, thinking about the present while being conscious of  the past.

Photo Credit: Camila Badaro